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Course Offerings

Education Courses 2015–2016

Course offerings for early childhood education, elementary education, secondary education and special education programs are listed on their specific web pages. The courses listed below are department-wide education offerings and courses for the minor in teaching English learners.

One unit of credit equals four semester hours. Prerequisite for all courses 200 level or higher: admission to program.

Bidisciplinary Course
Education Courses
Teaching English Learners Courses

Bidisciplinary Course

BID 322 Philosophy of Human Abilities
An examination of human ability and the social, cultural, philosophical and political influences on interactions with those having differing abilities. What is normal? What is a disability? What is it like to have a disability? How does our conception of human nature influence how we see and treat those with disabilities? How are disabilities rights movements attempting to alter our perception of disabilities? Why are looks so important to us and how do they influence our judgments? How do we perceive the bodies and faces of others? This course will address these questions and others by bringing philosophical inquiry and analysis to issues surrounding those with disabilities.

Education Courses

EDU 104 Cultural Foundations of Education in the United States
An introduction to cultural and systemic aspects of education in the United States, where we examine ideological,  theoretical and conceptual aspects of schooling through legal structures, fiction and non-fiction American literature, as well as philosophical writings. This course places emphasis on understanding education as a part of American society that includes cultural, historical, social, political, legal, racial and socioeconomic structures. Students will interrogate the culture of American education since its inception and ultimately locate their own educational agenda as teachers and United States citizens of American society.

EDU 121 Practicum in Mentoring, Peer Coaching and Tutoring
.25, .50 or 1.00 credit
Students will participate in peer coaching, mentoring, or tutoring field experiences supervised by a faculty member in the Department of Education and learn the skills needed to effectively support the learning and development of students from diverse backgrounds and age levels. A minimum of 30 hours is required for a full course. Pass/No Pass grading. Permission of the supervising professor will be required. May be repeated.

EDU 223 Education of PK-12 Learners with Exceptionalities
An introduction to the characteristics of children with cognitive, social, emotional and physical disabilities and educational principles applicable to them. Includes educational principles, methods and materials that may be useful in meeting the varying needs of learners with disabilities. This course is for students who are not yet enrolled in an education program or for students who plan to major in speech-language pathology.

EDU 311 Educational Psychology
An introduction to the psychological principles and theories of human development, learning and motivation in K-12 educational settings. Includes the study of educational research, child and adolescent development, developmentally appropriate and instructional best practices, individual differences, learning environment and assessment. Prerequisites: ENG 106; PSY 210 or EDU 104 and sophomore standing.

EDU 331 Race and Equity in Education
This course will examine the breadth and depth of scholarship on race and equity in education. Of particular interest to students in this course is how race as a social construction finds itself impacting the educational experiences of all students. Topics addressed in this class are racial categories, identity construction, silence, whiteness and the complexities of passive racism in teacher education. Students will be exposed to qualitative research methods designed to explore race in school settings and will be introduced to professional presentation opportunities. Prerequisite: EDU 104 or permission of instructor. Fall Term.

EDU 373 Using Picture Books and Informational/Non-Fiction Text to Teach Reading Skills & Strategies in K-8 Classrooms
This course offers teacher licensure candidates a unique opportunity to study effective ways to use picture books and informational/non-fiction text to teach literacy skills and strategies to K-8 students and is required for the Reading Teacher Endorsement. Prerequisite: ELM 300 or EED 210 or SPE 250; January Term.

EDU 380 Comparative Studies–Travel
This comparative studies and travel course varies with different travel destinations as they are offered.The travel destination will be reflected in the title of the course. May be repeated for credit when travel destination changes.

EDU 421 Practicum in the Field of Education
.25, .50 or 1.00 credit
Guided professional or clinical experience in various aspects of professional education such as research, collaboration with Pre-K through 12 school personnel, technology instruction and assessment, peer field supervision, tutoring, supervised teaching, etc. A minimum of 45 hours is required for a full course. Additional standards may be specified. Pass/No Pass grading. Prerequisites: ECE/EED/SEC/SPE 300 and consent of instructor. May be repeated.

EDU 441 Advanced Content Area Reading in the K-8 Classrooms
An advanced study of the developmental reading process, including examination of theories and practical applications for the K-8 teacher with a focus on methods and procedures used to develop skills, attitudes, knowledge, and understanding of content area reading. Prerequisite: ECE 318 or EED 314 or ELM 372 or SPE 316. For non-secondary education majors; January Term.

EDU 445 Literacy Practicum
An advanced application of the diagnosis and remediation of various reading and writing difficulties in a supervised literacy tutoring program (off-campus site). Prerequisite: SPE 440 or permission of the instructor. Pass/No Pass grading.

EDU 468 Internship in Education
.25, .50 or 1.00 credit
An advanced professional or clinical experience in the field of education supervised by a college faculty member and a certified or licensed professional in a Pre-K-12 school, school district, or educational services setting. A full-course internship requires the equivalent of 5 weeks of full-time experience or approximately 200 hours. Permission of department chair and supervising professor required. 

EDU 490 Special Investigations in Education
.50 or 1.00 credit
Designed to fit specific interests of advanced students. Students work by appointment either in individual or group studies under the supervision of one or more instructors. Upon request.

EDU 492/292 Independent Study in Education
Individually designed course under the supervision of a faculty member in the Department of Education.

EDU 495 Honors Independent Research
.50 credit
This course gives Honors Program students the opportunity to design and implement a significant research project in the field of education culminating in an appropriate public dissemination of research methods and findings. This research must build upon previous coursework taken within the major or minor, facilitating faculty supervision and guidance. Repeatable for credit. Permission of the faculty supervisor and the director of the Honors Program required prior to registration.

EDU 496 Special Topics in Education
Topics reflect current interest and need as indicated in contemporary professional education literature. Repeatable for credit.

EDU 521 Theory and Practice for Building Academic Literacies in K-12 Classrooms
.75 credit    
An advanced study of theories of literacies, the developmental reading process, and practical applications for reading across content areas. Includes reading methods and procedures used to develop skills, attitudes, knowledge, and understanding of content area reading material, and modification processes developed to maximize literate practices of all students. The course will blend in class meetings and applied learning alongside hybrid on-line instructional models, webinars, and assessments. This course is for graduate students in speech-language pathology seeking a non-teaching Professional Educator License. Summer Term.

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Teaching English Learners Courses

TEL 204 Cross-cultural Studies in Teaching English Language Learners
.75 credit
This course is designed for teacher candidates to examine the relationship among culture, classroom practices, and policy and how this relationship influences the education of the English language learners. Teacher candidates begin by first examining their own culture and their cultural assumptions and biases and how those influence teaching and learning in the classroom. Issues of equity, access and cross-cultural understandings are examined as well. Teacher candidates will analyze and redesign curriculum so that it is linguistically and culturally relevant. This course requires 10 field experience hours in an ESL and/or bilingual P-12 classroom. Prerequisite: EDU 104.

TEL 212 Theoretical Foundations of Teaching English Language Learners
.75 credit
This course is an introduction to and immersion into the theoretical frameworks of English as a Second Language (ESL) and Bilingual education and the research, movements, and policies that inform them. A variety of ESL/Bilingual models and programs that exist in pre-K through 12 schools and classrooms will be identified, analyzed, and evaluated through multiple assignment and media. Teacher candidates will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between theory and practice and will define their roles as teachers of and advocates for English learners. This course requires 10 field experience hours in an ESL and/or bilingual P-12 classroom. Prerequisite: EDU 104.

TEL 317 Methods and Materials for Teaching English Language Learners
.75 credit
This is an advanced course in the teaching of bilingual and sheltered English instruction to English language learners (ELLs). Students will learn different approaches and methodologies used to support the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in social and academic contexts. The course provides opportunities for teacher candidates to develop curriculum for ELLs in bilingual and ESL classrooms, and examine instructional delivery through videotaping and analyzing practice. This course requires 20 field experience hours in an ESL and/or bilingual P-12 classroom. Prerequisites: TEL 204 and TEL 212 and admission to teacher education.

TEL 319 Linguistics for Second Language Learning
.75 credit
The purpose of this course is to introduce linguistic concepts as they apply to teaching in a variety of contexts (including but not limited to) monolingual and bilingual classrooms. In addition, this course is designed to provide teachers with a meta-linguistic awareness in order to facilitate learning and instruction. This course will help students understand, think, and talk about the complexities of language, learning, and human development. The fields of linguistics, applied linguistics, and linguistic anthropology are dedicated to questions about the nature, function, and purposes of language. Students will use readings anchored in these disciplines to apply linguistics for teaching. This course requires 20 field experience hours in an ESL and/or bilingual P-12 classroom. Prerequisite: EDU 104.

TEL 439 Assessment of English Language Learners
.75 credit
This advanced course will focus on the discussion of basic principles and current approaches to assessment of language learning students in ESL and bilingual P-12 educational settings, including the policies, procedures, and issues that inform the assessment of English Language Learners (ELLs). Students will learn about the different purposes of process and product assessment tools, authentic and curriculum- based forms of assessment, issues in the assessment of ELLs, and assessment of academic content knowledge. As teacher candidates, students will have opportunities to examine critically and practice administering assessment tools used in current educational contexts. Students will learn to identify language needs and how to differentiate them from developmental needs. This course requires 20 field experience hours in an ESL and/or bilingual P-12 classroom. Prerequisites: TEL 204, TEL 212, TEL 317 and TEL 319 and admission to teacher education.

TEL 448 Inquiry and Application of Bilingual Methods I
.50 credit
This course is the first part of a two-course sequence in the inquiry and application of bilingual and ESL methods. In TEL 448, teacher candidates will design an action research proposal, which they will implement in TEL 449. The proposal will address how they will study their own teaching of bilingual and ESL methodologies that support the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in social and academic contexts. In preparation for conducting their action research in TEL 449, teacher candidates in TEL 448 will learn how to use action research methods to collect data on teaching practices and for research projects. They also will develop a situated and transformative action plan for future teaching that is anchored in sociocultural views of learning. Prerequisites: TEL 204, TEL 212, TEL 319, TEL 317 and admission to teacher education.

TEL 449 Inquiry and Application of Bilingual Methods II
.25 credit
This course is the second part of a two-course sequence in the inquiry and application of bilingual and ESL methods. Students will implement an action research proposal of teacher inquiry that they developed in TEL 448. Students will study their own teaching of bilingual and ESL methodologies that support the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in social and academic contexts. Teacher candidates also will implement their action plans developed in TEL 448 to collect classroom data, analyze critically their own bilingual and ESL instructional practices, and report findings that inform their future teaching of language learners. This course requires 30 field experience hours in an ESL and/or bilingual P-12 classroom. Prerequisite: TEL 448.

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