Courses

Course offerings reflect the 2018-2019 Elmhurst College Catalog. One unit of credit equals four semester hours.

The aim of this class is to examine the philosophical foundation and basic tenets of occupational therapy practice. This course will address the core concepts that underlie practice as identified within the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain and Process. The course will address the implications of history, culture and the sociopolitical environment on theories and practice in occupational therapy and occupational science. Course content will focus on an examination of theories and models guiding practice and a systematic review of the literature and official documents of the profession as a foundation for supporting ethical practice decisions. The role of personal and professional responsibility in professional development and engagement is emphasized. Students will be introduced to the process of professional credentialing (including certification and licensure), accreditation practices and standards, and the effect public policy has on these processes.

The aim of this class is to introduce students to the scientific method as a problem-solving process, developing experimental procedures for answering research questions, the process of evidence-based practice, learning to establish and test hypotheses, and summarizing and interpreting data.

This is a core class for the master’s program in health informatics. The aim of this course is to explore the historical development of, and current issues within, the U.S. health care system and U.S. health policy. By examining major stakeholders (e.g., the government, managed care organizations, private insurance providers) and health polices—particularly with regard to cost, quality and access to care—we will compare the strengths and weaknesses of each, as well as their impact on individual patients and the health care system as a whole. We will analyze and critically assess the planning, finance, organization, administration and evaluation of health policy in relation to the U.S. health care system.

The aim of this class is to examine occupation as a social determinant of health. Course content will address population health issues and the influence of occupation on the promotion of health and the prevention of disease and disability. The contribution of occupational science and occupational therapy to the health and well-being of society is explored. Factors that influence service provision, management, context and the approaches used to promote health are examined through a broad exposure to the delivery models and systems used in current and emerging practice. Prerequisite: HCA 508.

The aim of this level I fieldwork class is to introduce students to the needs of persons, groups and populations in the context of practice and focus on the psychological and social factors that influence engagement in occupation. This experience will enhance students’ exploration of the biological, psychological, social and cultural factors that contribute to health, and influence the life satisfaction of service recipients within emerging practice areas. Students will gather information through an occupational profile used to identify ways in which health literacy, subjective experiences of health, illness and disability impact recipient choices and influence recipient-provider interactions.

The aim of this class is to provide students with a foundation in human development, learning and behavior. The course will focus on neurobiology, disorders of the human nervous system and behavioral phenomena that accompany disturbances in the processing of information and mediating of behavior across the lifespan. Students will explore the etiology, clinical course, management and prognosis of symptoms associated with mental health, sensory and cognitive/learning challenges interfering with the performance of everyday life activities.

The aim of this class is to engage students in inter-professional and intra-professional discussions and dialogue related to collaborative care and the implications of practitioners’ actions on the delivery of services in the region.

The aim of this class is to engage students in the evaluation process specific to providing occupational therapy services to persons, groups and populations experiencing challenges with affective, cognitive, perceptual and sensory functions of the body influencing health and well-being across the lifespan. The course will review the etiology, symptoms, clinical course, management and prognosis of symptoms in context of the evaluation of occupational performance. The course will cover the occupational profile, assessment process and procedures, test selection, analysis of occupational performance and identification of targeted outcomes. Prerequisites: HCA 508, MOT 500, MOT 520.

The aim of this class is to involve students in the interventions process specific to persons, groups and populations experiencing mental health challenges across the lifespan. The course will concentrate on selecting approaches to intervention. Approaches examined will include health promotion, remediation, restoration, compensation, adaptation and disability prevention. An emphasis will be placed on intervention planning, implementation and review, while targeting outcomes specific to persons, groups and populations experiencing mental health challenges across the lifespan. Prerequisite: MOT 528.

The aim of this class is to involve students in the interventions process specific to persons, groups and populations experiencing challenges processing sensory and cognitive information affecting mental functions and learning across the lifespan. The course will concentrate on selecting approaches to intervention. Approaches examined will include health promotion, remediation, restoration, compensation, adaptation and disability prevention. An emphasis will be placed on intervention planning, implementation and review, while targeting outcomes specific to persons, groups and populations experiencing learning challenges across the lifespan. Prerequisite: MOT 528.

The aim of this class is to involve teams of students, under the supervision of a faculty advisor, in the planning of a collaborative service project that involves participatory research addressing the promotion of health and/or prevention of disease and disability of persons, groups or populations within the local region. Students will have an opportunity to utilize skills associated with the intervention planning and inter-professional collaboration processes within a community setting. The completed project plan will include a review of the literature, and an outline of all necessary steps and activities associated with implementing and measuring outcomes of the project and documenting findings. Students will provide a personal reflective analysis of the process. Prerequisites: MOT 504, MOT 512, MOT 516.

The aim of this class is to address neurobiology and disorders of the human nervous system that accompany disturbances in the processing of movement related functions across the lifespan. Students will explore the etiology, clinical course, management and prognosis of symptoms associated with neuromusculoskeletal and movement-related functions interfering with the performance of everyday life activities. Prerequisite: MOT 520.

The aim of this class is to study the relationship among the skeletal system, muscular system, nerve innervations and joint actions in humans. Prerequisite: MOT 544.

The aim of this class is to engage students in the evaluation process specific to providing occupational therapy services to persons, groups and populations experiencing acute and chronic physical health challenges across the lifespan. The course will review the etiology, symptoms, clinical course, management and prognosis of symptoms in context of the evaluation of occupational performance. The course will cover the occupational profile, assessment process and procedures, test selection, analysis of occupational performance and identification of targeted outcomes. Prerequisites: MOT 500, HCA 508, MOT 520.

The aim of this class is to involve students in the intervention process specific to persons, groups and populations experiencing acute physical health challenges across the lifespan. The course will concentrate on selecting approaches to intervention. Approaches examined will include health promotion, remediation, restoration, compensation, adaptation and disability prevention. An emphasis will be placed on intervention planning, implementation and review, while targeting outcomes specific to persons, groups and populations experiencing acute physical health challenges across the lifespan. Prerequisite: MOT 552.

The aim of this class is to involve students in the intervention process specific to persons, groups and populations experiencing chronic physical health challenges across the lifespan. The course will concentrate on selecting approaches to intervention. Approaches examined will include health promotion, remediation, restoration, compensation, adaptation and disability prevention. An emphasis will be placed on intervention planning, implementation and review, while targeting outcomes specific to persons, groups and populations experiencing chronic physical health challenges across the lifespan. Prerequisite: MOT 552.

The aim of this class is to involve teams of students in the completion of a collaborative service-learning project with a community partner, under faculty supervision. Students will have an opportunity to utilize skills associated with intervention implementation, intervention review and inter-professional collaboration processes. The completed scholarly project will include a written paper that covers a review of the literature, the steps and activities associated with implementing the project, and documenting findings and conclusions, with each participant providing a personal reflective analysis of the process. Prerequisite: MOT 540.

The aim of this class is to provide students with a summative evaluation of the students’ academic performance in preparation for level II fieldwork. Students will participate in the presentation of the team service-learning project and will receive summative feedback on ability-based performance outcomes focused on the student’s cognitive, affective and psychomotor performance in the program. Prerequisites: MOT 524, MOT 528, MOT 532, MOT 536, MOT 552, MOT 556, MOT 560, MOT 564.

The aim of this full-time, 12-week (or equivalent) practicum experience under the supervision of a registered occupational therapist (OTR) is to involve students in the practice of occupational therapy. The fieldwork level II experience provides students with an opportunity to transfer knowledge and skills learned in the academic environment to a professional context. Prerequisite: MOT 568.

The aim of this full-time, 12-week (or equivalent) practicum experience under the supervision of a registered occupational therapist (OTR) is to involve students in the practice of occupational therapy. The fieldwork level II experience provides students with an opportunity to transfer knowledge and skills learned in the academic environment to a professional context. Prerequisite: MOT 568.

The aim of this class is to provide students with an opportunity to use advanced reasoning and reflective practice skills to compare, contrast and analyze the contribution of occupational therapy to the health and well-being of society. Students will examine the transformation of personal perspectives and commitment as future occupational therapy practitioners to continued personal andprofessional development and engagement contributing to the advancement of the occupational therapy profession. Prerequisites: MOT 572, MOT 576.

Elmhurst College reserves the right to modify courses, schedules and program format without advance notice to students.

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