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Courses

Course offerings reflect the 2020-2021 Elmhurst University Catalog. One unit of credit equals four semester hours.

NOTE: Courses marked with * are only taught during January Terms on a revolving schedule.

Biology | Medical Laboratory Science Track: Hines VA Hospital Affiliate & NorthShore University HealthSystem Affiliate | Diagnostic Medical Sonography Track | Nuclear Medicine Technology Track – Northwestern Memorial Hospital Affiliate | Radiation Therapy Track

Biology

Life, its origin, chemistry, energy transformations, reproduction, genetics, evolution and ecology. Design and execution of experiments using the scientific method. Not applicable for biology major or minor. Includes laboratory.

See BID 100. Not applicable for the biology major or minor.

Anatomy, physiology, development, genetics, evolution and ecology of humans, including current topics. Not applicable for biology major or minor. Includes laboratory.

Biological relationships between living and nonliving components of the natural world, and the significance to humans as members of natural ecosystems. Biological and environmental consequences of technological, political, legal and ethical issues will be discussed. Not applicable for a biology major or minor. Includes laboratory.

See BID 106. Not applicable for the biology major or minor.

Structure and function of the human body and of underlying biological principles. Designed for students in nursing, physical education and health sciences. Not applicable for biology major or minor. Includes laboratory with human cadaver.

Continuation of BIO 107. BIO 107 is not a prerequisite for this course. Not applicable for biology major or minor. Includes laboratory with human cadaver.

Introduction to biological concepts, including origins of life, biochemical principles, energetics, cellular organization, mechanisms of heredity and evolution. Students will explore unifying concepts in biological science while developing key investigative skills necessary for scientific exploration and hypothesis testing. Includes laboratory.

Introduction to biological concepts, including classification and levels of organization, organismal biology including surveys of plant biology and zoology, ecology and conservation biology. Students will explore unifying concepts in biological science while developing key investigative skills necessary for scientific exploration and hypothesis testing. Includes laboratory.

.25 credit

Introduces the methods and elements of biological research to students who transfer BIO 200 credit from another institution. Instructs students in the process of writing a scientific paper including instruction into the library resources available to biology majors as well as how to access them to produce a scientific research paper.

Prerequisite: BIO 200 transfer credit

See BIO 107.

See BIO 108.

Bacteria, viruses, fungi, algae, protozoa and multicellular parasites in relation to health and disease, plus immunological concepts and environmental microbiology. Not applicable to biology major or minor. Includes laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO 107, BIO 108, CHM 101 or CHM 211, CHM 103.

Principles of human genetics. Topics include basic cell function, patterns and mechanisms of inheritance, the causes of genetic abnormality, issues related to new genetic technology, and the principles of population genetics and human evolution. Not applicable to the biology major or minor. Includes laboratory.

Introduction to the basic principles of genetics and modern molecular techniques used to study organisms at the cellular, organismal and population level. Topics include Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance, gene mapping in eukaryotes and prokaryotes, DNA structure and function, gene regulation, genetic variation from recombination and mutation, genomics and population genetics.

Prerequisites: BIO 200, BIO 201.

Examination of plant genetics, reproduction, development, tissue culture and methods to create transgenic plants. Examples of transgenic plants developed for basic research, agriculture, medicine and energy production will be discussed, as well as relevant controversies and ethical considerations. The laboratory portion of the course involves hands-on experience working with transgenic plants, and use of molecular genetic methods to analyze these plants. Students will also be required to write a research grant proposal detailing proposed genetic studies of plants. Includes laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO 200, BIO 201, BIO 315.

Morphology, physiology, taxonomy, genetics and culture of prokaryotes. Emphasizes microbial metabolism plus pathogenic, food, industrial and environmental microbiology. Includes laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO 200, BIO 201, BIO 315, CHM 211,CHM 212, CHM 311.

Integrated comparative examination of the evolution of organ systems of animals in the Phylum Chordata. Detailed dissection of shark, mud puppy, cat and other chordates. Includes laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO 200, BIO 201.

Physiology, genetics and morphology of development from gamete production to organ formation in animals Developmental anatomy of the sea urchin, frog and chick. Includes laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO 200, BIO 201, BIO 315.

Anatomy and functions of cells and tissues that make up the vascular plant body. Physiology, ecology and evolution of major plant divisions will be considered. Includes laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO 200, BIO 201.

This course will introduce students to the principles of paleontology and the application of those principles to interpreting fossils. The course will follow a fossil through its life cycle, beginning with topics such as the process of fossilization and taphonomy. This class will examine the types of qualitative and quantitative data that can be gathered from a fossil and how such data can be used to reconstruct the anatomy, physiology and ecology of organisms. Other topics include allometry, functional morphology and geometric morphometrics. The laboratory will introduce a variety of paleontological techniques which students will apply to plant, invertebrate and vertebrate fossils.

Prerequisites: BIO 200, BIO 201.

Study of the evolutionary relationships and functional morphology of single-celled eukaryotes and non-vertebrate animals. Aspects of physiology, anatomy, development and ecology will be considered. Laboratory includes dissection and observation of representative forms. Includes laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO 200, BIO 201.

Study of the structure and function of the human immune system. Detailed discussion of the innate and adaptive immune systems as well as the cells and molecules that make up the immune system, specifically B & T cells, and problems that occur when the immune system malfunctions. Includes laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO 200, BIO 201, BIO 315.

Study of the molecular and cellular basis of cancer. This course focuses on cancer cell structure and function, including cancer genes, cell signaling, tumorigenesis, tumor progression, treatment and related topics. Includes laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO 200, BIO 201, BIO 315.

Exploration of the interactions and relationships of animals and plants to the living (biotic) and nonliving (abiotic) components of their environment. Emphasis on ecosystem, community and population ecology, and their relationship to evolutionary biology. Includes laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO 200, BIO 201.

Conservation biology is the scientific study of the phenomena that affect the maintenance, loss and restoration of biological diversity while including aspects of ecology, environmental science, ethics, economics and politics. Emphasizes the impacts of human activity on various ecosystems with strategies for preserving and restoring global ecosystems. Laboratory included.

Prerequisites: BIO 200, BIO 201, BIO 315.

.25 to 1.00 credit

See BIO 452.

Animal behavior is the study of the biological basis of the activity patterns and mechanisms in animals in the context of evolutionary biology. The study of animal behavior includes the examination of animal locomotion, communication, social behaviors and behavioral ecology. Laboratories include analyses of behavior patterns and mechanisms in the laboratory and field. Includes laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO 200, BIO 201.

Evolution and diversification of the vertebrates examined through multiple perspectives including paleontology and modern zoology. Exploration of the cycle of speciation and extinction and major trends in vertebrate evolution, such as the transition of life onto land. Field trips and species identification. Includes laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO 200, BIO 201.

The theory of evolution by natural selection with an emphasis on the genetics of populations, including adaptation, speciation and systematics. Includes laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO 200, BIO 201, BIO 315.

Study of the structure and function of biological macromolecules, especially DNA and RNA, and manipulation of these macromolecules through modern molecular genetic techniques. Students will acquire hands-on experience in molecular genetic techniques by manipulating DNA extracted and/or amplified from prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Includes laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO 200, BIO 201, BIO 315.

A detailed study of the microscopic and gross structure of the human body. Includes the study of cell and tissue structure, and a detailed study of gross body structure. Laboratories include a study of human cadavers, microscope slides and model human structures. Includes laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO 200, BIO 201, BIO 315.

Vascular plants from seed to death. Includes water relations, photosynthesis, respiration, growth, photoperiodic responses, nutrition and flowering. Includes laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO 200, BIO 201, BIO 315.

Addresses the principles that underlie function in humans and other animals. The course includes basic biological, chemical and physical processes in animal tissues, detailed consideration of organ systems, and an integrative approach to understanding how animals meet the demands placed upon them. Includes laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO 200, BIO 201, BIO 315.

Study of the structure, organization and function of cells individually and in their environment. Includes studies of membrane function, transport, communication, motility and related topics. Includes laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO 200, BIO 201, BIO 315.

This course provides a comprehensive examination of the basic principles of neuroscience. Topics include the structure of neurons and glia, neurogenesis, electrical and chemical signaling properties of neurons and their underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms, and the foundational organization of select neural systems. Included laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO 200, BIO 201 and BIO 315.

This course provides a comprehensive examination of the basic principles of stem cell biology. Topics include introduction to stem cell biology, an in depth look at specific populations of stem cells (hematopoeitic, neural, etc.), stem cell research, and applications in medicine. Includes laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO 200, BIO 201, and BIO 315.

This course examines both the short-term and long-term behavioral and physiological adjustments that allow organisms to survive and reproduce in the face of changing biotic and abiotic environments. Emphasis will be placed on physiological responses to oxygen availability, temperature, water and solutes, competition, nutrient availability, disease, pH, and exposure to toxins. Includes laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO 200, BIO 201, and BIO 315.

Applied and environmental microbiology examining the role of microorganisms in biogeochemical cycling in nature, mechanisms of nutrient turnover, and evaluation of remediation possibilities. Emphasis on the inter-relatedness of ecology and microbiology and the essentiality of microorganisms in shaping global ecosystems. Field trips and sample collection. Includes laboratory.

Prerequisites: CHM 211, CHM 212, CHM 311, BIO 200, BIO 201, BIO 315; BIO 321 strongly recommended.

.50 to 1.00 credit

Variable experiences in biology including international courses and study under outside organizations, e.g. ACCA, Field Museum of Natural History, Shedd Aquarium, Morton Arboretum, Chicago Academy of Sciences or individually designed programs. Elmhurst University students may take a maximum of one off-campus course to fulfill an upperlevel biology elective; however, these courses will not fulfill a category requirement. Grading optional. Includes laboratory or fieldwork.

Prerequisite: biology major or departmental consent.

Systematics is the study of the origins of biological diversity by reconstructing the relationships and patterns of evolutionary events that lead to the current distribution and diversity of life. This course will introduce the philosophical underpinnings and practical methods for phylogenetic inference. Both morphological and molecular based techniques will be addressed through the application of several phylogenetic tree-building programs using data sets of differing types.

Prerequisites: BIO 200, BIO 201, BIO 315.

An exploration of life in water comparing and contrasting marine and freshwater systems. This course will focus on the integration of scientific disciplines (chemical, physical, biological) and across levels of biological organization, from genes to organisms to ecosystems. Emphasis on the organismal adaptations, ecological interactions and community structures that have evolved in response to living in the aquatic realm.

Prerequisites: BIO 200, BIO 201, BIO 315.

.25 to .50 credit

Provides selected biology students with an opportunity to obtain career experience through involvement with biology related businesses, health care organizations, government agencies or institutions. Approved internships may meet the biology capstone requirement upon completion. Applications should be made early in the term preceding registration and are reviewed on the basis of grade-point average, faculty recommendations, professional progress and demonstrated interest.

Offered on a Pass/No Pass basis. Not repeatable for credit. Does not fulfill a requirement for an upper-level elective biology course for the major. Prerequisites: biology major, BIO 200, BIO 201, junior or senior standing, and GPA of 2.5 or higher.

.25 credit

Preparation and formalization of a research proposal under the guidance of a faculty member. Students will conduct extensive literature review on the proposed subject.

Prerequisite: consent of faculty member.

.50 credit

Student-originated, faculty-guided investigations for majors or minors in biology. This research will build upon previous coursework taken within the major or minor, and a final research paper is required. Course fulfills the prerequisite for BIO 498 Capstone Seminar. Repeatable for credit.

Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and consent of the faculty member

.25 credit

Provides an opportunity for students wishing to earn their experiential learning credit through an independent research project involving off-campus constituencies.

Must be taken concurrently with BIO 492 or BIO 495.

.50 credit

This course gives Honors Program students the opportunity to design and implement a significant research project in the field of biology, culminating in an appropriate public dissemination of research methods and findings. This research must build upon previous coursework taken within the major or minor, facilitating faculty supervision and guidance. This course fulfills the prerequisite for BIO 498 Capstone Seminar.

Repeatable for credit. Permission of the faculty supervisor and the director of the Honors Program required prior to registration.

.00 credit

Provides an opportunity for students to earn an upper-level biology elective credit through an independent research project. Students must complete a faculty-approved annotated bibliography, a department-approved grant proposal, and write a final scientific paper in order to earn credit.

Prerequisites: Completion of at least one term of BIO 492 or BIO 495 and faculty approval of a written research proposal. Course must be taken concurrently with BIO 492 or BIO 495; instructor permission required.

.50 credit

A course required of all majors in the Department of Biology. In addition to journal article discussions, students will summarize and share their research experiences in a professional presentation suitable for scientific meetings or conferences. The presentation will provide evidence of what the student has learned as a biology major in terms of knowledge, skills and insights. To be taken in the first or second term of the senior year.

Prerequisites: senior standing and successful completion of all three biology category courses (C, O and P) or one term of BIO 492/495, or be in third year of the HST major.

Medical Laboratory Science Track

Hines VA Hospital Affiliate

1.25 credits

Study of the origin, development, morphology, physiology, and pathophysiology of the formed elements of the blood and bone marrow. Manual and automated methods of cell counting, differentiation and other special hematological procedures on blood & body fluids used in disease diagnosis.

1.50 credits

Theory and practice of the isolation and identification of pathogenic bacteria and mycobacteria in clinical specimens through cultures, morphology, biochemical and/or serological reactions and their drug susceptibility. The relation of clinical testing to disease states is also included.

2.0 credits

Part I: Theory and practice of analytical biochemistry as applied to pathologic states,methodology and instrumentation. Statistics are applied to reagent preparation, result determination and quality control. Includes clinical significance.

Part II: Theory and practice of analytical biochemistry as applied to specialized tests for drugs, endocrine function and blood gas analysis. The relation of clinical testing, including Molecular Biology techniques, to disease states is also included.

.75 credit

Study of the principles of the protective and adversive aspects of the cellular and humoral immune responses, theory and performance of test procedures based on antigen-antibody reactions and clinical significance of test results are included.

.50 credit

Theory and practice of biochemical analyses and microscopic examination of urine and other body fluids. Includes clinical significance of lab data.

.50 credit

Study of the platelet, vascular, coagulation, and fibrinolytic systems. Testing procedures and the application of the principles of hemostasis as related to disease states and therapeutic monitoring are also included.

1.0 credit

Study of red cell antigen-antibody systems, antibody screening and identification, compatibility testing and immunopathologic conditions. Also included are donor requirements & blood component preparation and hemotherapy.

.25 credit

Theory and practice of the isolation and identification of fungi, parasites and viruses utilizing morphological, cultural, biochemical and serological methods. The relation of clinical testing to disease states and epidemiology as it applies to microbiology is also included.

.25 credit

An overview of medical ethics, patient approach, the theory and practice of phlebotomy techniques, laboratory safety, applications of laboratory computer systems and independent clinical research and development. In addition, clinical management and education will be covered in this course, including an introduction of the principles and theory of management and education as related to the clinical laboratory. The special job responsibilities of the medical laboratory scientist in management and education are addressed.

NorthShore University HealthSystem Affiliate

1.50 credits

In the Hematology Laboratory students learn to count and classify the various types of red and white blood cells. They also learn how to determine whether the oxygen-carrying red blood cells are in a healthy state, an essential procedure for diagnosis of anemia. In addition, the students will be shown how to classify the cells in the bone marrow to assist the pathologist in the identification of leukemia and other blood disorders. Tests are conducted in the Coagulation section of the Hematology Laboratory to determine the presence or absence of factors essential to normal blood coagulation. Special procedures are performed to identify acquired and inherited deficiencies of the coagulation proteins.

1.50 credits

The Microbiology Laboratory has the responsibility of isolating and identifying potentially pathogenic microorganisms. In many cases the laboratory also determines the susceptibility of the etiologic agent to a variety of antibiotics. This laboratory is divided into Bacteriology, Mycology, Mycobacteriology, Parasitology, and Virology. Bacteriology is concerned with the various bacteria that may cause direct destruction of tissue or harmful sequelae. Throat, urine, stool, blood, wound and sputum cultures are some of the types of specimens received for processing.

1.25 credits

In almost every illness, changes occur in the chemical constituents of blood and other body fluids. Physicians rely on the Clinical Chemistry Laboratory to help in the diagnosis and treatment of diabetes, kidney disease, electrolyte imbalance and cardiac dysfunction through the analysis of patient samples. State-of-the art automation and robotics enable the laboratory to provide critical diagnostic information quickly and accurately to physicians in such areas as the emergency department, intensive care, surgery and the neonatal intensive care unit. In addition, the Clinical Chemistry Laboratory offers testing for the assessment of many metabolic systems that can include cholesterol measurement, thyroid and reproductive hormone levels, and therapeutic drug monitoring. Students will work with up-to-date, computer-assisted technology to provide critical as well as routine testing for effective patient care.

.75 credit

The Immunopathology Laboratory performs state-of-the art testing in Flow Cytometry and Diagnostic Immunology. In Flow Cytometry special emphasis is placed on diagnosis of leukemias and lymphomas and monitoring of immunologic pathologies. Rotation through the Immunology section includes performance of protein chemistry and infectious disease serology; detection of tumor markers; and pregnancy and prenatal diagnosis.

.25 credit

The Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory is the fastest growing laboratory in our institution, reflecting the explosion in knowledge about the human genome and the availability of new tools to examine DNA and RNA. Highly sensitive nucleic acid amplification methods, including real- time PCR, are used to detect low concentrations of infectious agents such as Herpes simplex virus. Quantitative (viral load) tests for hepatitis C and HIV nucleic acid are used to monitor response to therapy. Analysis of mutated genes is performed to evaluate patients with clotting disorders, and clonal gene rearrangement studies are used in the diagnosis of lymphomas.

.25 credit

In the Body Fluids section of this rotation, body fluids are examined to determine the kinds and numbers of body cells present. It is in this laboratory that both quantitative and qualitative testing of urine is done. Urinalysis involves testing for pH, color, specific gravity, sugars and excessive amounts f protein. Specimens are also examined for the presence of bacteria and parasites as well as crystals and casts formed by the kidneys.

1.25 credits

The student will learn the techniques of ABO blood grouping methods, Rh testing, crossmatching and identification of atypical antibodies. In addition, the student learns about the preparation and use of blood components and observes blood collection procedures including whole blood and apheresis donations, as well as hematopoietic progenitor cell collection. Blood bank activities require close coordination with the clinical care units, so students in this laboratory have a sense of direct involvement in patient care.

.25 credit

In Parasitology specimens are examined for the presence of amoebae, malarial organisms, worms and their ova, and flagellates. Larger parasites, such as mites, fleas or ticks are also identified so the appropriate disease diagnosis can be made, treatment started, and public health concerns addressed. The Virology Laboratory isolates viruses such as influenza, chicken pox, cytomegalovirus, and herpes from clinical specimens. Students will learn to perform methods and procedures used to isolate and identify these and other viruses.

.25 credit

Mycology deals with fungi that may infect man on the surface of the skin (i.e., ringworm) or cause systemic complications (i.e., histoplasmosis). Mycobacteriology is the study of such organisms as that which causes tuberculosis.

.25 credit

Lectures and clinical rotation demonstrating the proper collection and processing of blood for routine and special tests are given. Both venipuncture and dermal puncture techniques are presented. Medical Laboratory Science students will gain competence drawing blood for laboratory testing in the Outpatient Laboratory and hospital patient care units.

.50 credit

Group dynamics, basic educational theory, the five functions of management and a variety of related topics are presented through lecture and group activities.

Diagnostic Medical Sonography Track

.25 credit

Introduction to the basics of nursing techniques, medical professionalism, and patient care. Topics covered include nursing procedures, medical emergencies, ethics, confidentiality, HIPAA, hospital safety, informed consent, conscious sedation, patient transfer, infection control, professional development and certification, departmental organization and administration, QA/QC, and an introduction to hospital administration.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the DMS program.

.50 credit

The course is presented in two parts: general pathology and neoplasia. The general pathology component introduces basic disease concepts, theories of disease causation and systemby-system pathophysiologic disorders most frequently encountered in clinical practice. The neoplasia component provides an in-depth study of new and abnormal development of cells.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the DMS program.

.50 credit

Study of human anatomy in the transverse, longitudinal, and coronal planes. Emphasis on the organs in the abdomen, pelvis, thorax, and neck. Demonstration of how these structures appear on ultrasound scans, computerized tomography, and MRI.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the DMS program.

1.00 credit

Study of normal anatomy and sonographic appearances of abdominal structures and superficial structures. Normal variants, congenital anomalies, physiology, and related laboratory tests are covered. Sonographic methods used to visualize abdominal structures and organs. Includes laboratory section on basic scanning techniques.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the DMS program.

.75 credit

Study of obstetrical and gynecological anatomy. Clinical applications and sonographic methods used to visualize pelvic organs, the pregnant uterus, and related structures. Discussion of embryogenesis and the reproductive cycle. Study of normal sonographic patterns.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the DMS program.

.50 credit

Application of sonographic scanning procedures in a hospital setting under the supervision of a qualified registered diagnostic sonographer. Emphasis on liver, GB, pancreas, gallbladder, obstetrics, and pelvic areas. Pass-fail grading.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the DMS program.

.75 credit

Introduction and study of the fundamental principles of diagnostic ultrasound physics. Study of acoustic energy and diagnostic ultrasound equipment instrumentation, artifacts and quality control.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the DMS program or consent of Program Director.

1.00 credit

Study of obstetrical and gynecological pathology. Instrumentation and techniques for optimization of sonographic obstetrical and gynecological images are reviewed. Comparison of normal sonographic patterns with pathology appearances, physiology, differentials, and correlation with lab tests and related organ involvement. Discussion and correlation of congenital abnormalities, causes, and sonographic appearances.

Prerequisite: OB-GYN Sonography

.75 credit

Study of abdominal anatomy, breast, and thyroid pathologies and sonographic patterns. Comparison of normal sonographic patterns with pathology appearances, physiology, differentials, and related organ involvement. Correlation of relevant laboratory data, clinical symptoms with pathologies. Discussion of pediatric pathologies.

Prerequisite: Abdomen Sonography

.75 credit

This course emphasizes clinical experience progression under the supervision of faculty, sonography staff, and clinical instructor. Continued practicum in the clinical applications of abdominal sonography, female pelvis, and obstetrical applications. Effective communication, operation of equipment, patient care, and technical skills developed. Pass-fail grading.

Prerequisite: Clinical Education I.

.50 credit

Continuation of the study of principles of diagnostic ultrasound physics, including artifacts, Doppler, 3D, harmonic imaging, contrast agents, bioeffects and safety.

Prerequisite: Physics I or consent of Program Director.

.25 credit

Study of image critique, technical factors, and sonographic interpretation. Review of sonographic terminology, image quality factors, scanning protocols and techniques, and normal sonographic appearances of abdominal, OB-GYN, and vascular structures. Integration of clinical history and pathology in the interpretation of pathologic sonograms and Doppler data.

Prerequisite: Abdomen Pathology, OB-GYN Pathology

.75 credit

The student begins to demonstrate full competency in various exams and advances toward more independent scanning under the supervision of sonography staff and clinical instructor. Emphasis remains on abdominal, small parts, and obstetrical-gynecological sonography. The student will have an opportunity to refine skills and increase self-confidence through progressively more independent scanning. Overview of hospital operations, including departmental billing policies. Pass-fail grading.

Prerequisite: Clinical Education II.

.25 credit

Discussion of pediatric and neonatal anatomy and imaging techniques. Newborn neurosonography and pathologies are reviewed. Basic adult vascular imaging is discussed, including peripheral vasculature and carotid artery anatomy and pathology. Imaging techniques, protocols, spectral and color flow Doppler interrogation and interpretation are reviewed. Peripheral venous and carotid imaging is performed in a laboratory setting.

Prerequisite: Abdomen Sonography, Physics II.

.50 credit

Study of abdominal, superficial parts, newborn, and invasive procedures. Areas studied include neonatal procedures, breast and prostate pathology, transplants, GI tract, soft tissues, musculoskeletal, and invasive procedures. Presentation of pathologic processes, sonographic appearances, and clinical history correlation.

Prerequisite: Abdomen Sonography

1.00 credit

In this final period of clinical study, the student demonstrates full competency and progresses to full independence under the supervision of sonography staff and clinical instructor. Emphasis on accuracy and efficiency in pathology identification, diagnosis, and related organ involvement documentation. Rotations in the practice of peripheral vascular exams, pediatrics, breast imaging, and other specialties within the field may be arranged. Pass-fail grading.

Prerequisite: Clinical Education III.

.50 credit

Comprehensive registry reviews for the ARDMS examinations. Practice exams and mock registries are an integral part of this review. Applications for registry examinations are provided and reviewed.

Prerequisite: Abdomen Pathology, OB-GYN Pathology, Specialty Sonography, Physics I & II.

Nuclear Medicine Technology Track

Northwestern Memorial Hospital Affiliate

.75 credit for each course

Emphasis on theory and techniques of clinical procedures used in nuclear medicine imaging. Areas emphasized include patient care, developing acquisition parameters, imaging techniques, radionuclide identification, energies, half-lives, and principles of radionuclides in imaging and non-imaging procedures, including PET & SPECT/CT. Students will continue to develop an increased degree of competence in their performance of the skills related to critical thinking and problem-solving.

.75 credit

The general goal of this class is to familiarize students with the various aspects of nuclear pharmacy and the specific radiopharmaceuticals handled within this field.

.25 credit

This course introduces the student to the effects of ionizing radiation and chemotherapeutic agents on living tissue. Emphasis is placed on the concept of the therapeutic ratio and the manipulation of influencing factors in order to affect patient treatment outcomes.

.50 credit

This course introduces the student to the field of pathology with an emphasis on the oncologic disease processes. Topics range from discussion of pathology from the cellular level through various organ systems. Students are introduced to terminology related to the field of pathology as a whole and to the subspecialty of oncology specifically.

1.00 credit for each course

Supervised clinical education that gives the student the opportunity to perform and assist with a variety of patient procedures on both SPECT, SPECT/CT, PET/CT, and PET/MR imaging systems for all diagnostic, therapeutic, non-imaging in-vivo and in-vitro procedures. Clinical competencies developed in patient care, positioning techniques, analyzing images, and the selection of imaging parameters and collimators. Knowledge of integrated computer systems designed for use with clinical gamma cameras, Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT), SPECT/CT, Positron Emission Tomography (PET), and PET/CT images. The clinical practicum is designed to promote independent critical thinking, balanced responsibility, organization and accountability in the student. Students will demonstrate competence in all procedures presented.

.75 credit

Radiation Safety incorporates the principles and practices of employing radiation protection techniques in adherence to the ALARA philosophy. The course includes theory and principles associated with radioactive decay, radiation interaction with matter, and radionuclide production. Federal, state, and institutional regulations regarding ionizing radiation are reviewed. Radiation detection equipment, monitoring of exposure, decontamination processes, and proper usage, administration, storage and disposal of radiation sources are also focused upon.

.75 credit

Evaluation, maintenance and function of instrumentation used in imaging and in the laboratory. Principles and theory of PET/ CT and scintillation camera operation and performance. Radiation measurement, event counting activity, pulse height spectra, detection efficiency, resolving time and statistics. Flood field and bar phantom use for assessing camera uniformity, relative sensitivity, spatial linearity and resolution testing. Quality assurance procedures for the PET scanner include radial, tangential and axial resolution, sensitivity, linearity, uniformity, attenuation accuracy, scatter determination and dead time corrections. Knowledge of the operations and maintenance of computer hardware and software. Emphasis on data collection, analysis and processing used in clinical imaging. Application of computer devices and memory usage. Emphasis on SPECT, SPECT/CT, PET and PET/ CT quality control procedures.

.50 credit

Demonstrate ability to integrate and apply clinical and didactic knowledge. Provides a first look at sectional anatomy, with focus on the study of normal sectional anatomy via diagrams and radiologic images (including but not limited to CT, MRI, and PET). Also presents a more in-depth overview of CT scanning. Specific topics include the physics and instrumentation of CT scanning, image production, and CSA of the head, neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis with comparison of CT CSA to PET images. Emphasis will be placed on patient considerations, patient safety, and radiation protection.

.75 credit (398) 1st semester
.25 credit (402) 2nd semester

Skills in problem-solving, critical thinking, and decision making are developed as well as oral and written communication skills. Career skills are enhanced through the interview process, resume writing, and administrative duties including budgeting, medical and legal considerations, and political issues affecting health care. Special emphasis is placed on participation in quality control and scheduling guidelines programs. Focus is placed on basic measures necessary to provide quality patient care. Basic principles of recordkeeping and maintaining confidentiality of information are explained.

.75 credit

Theory and physical principles associated with atomic and nuclear structure, and quantum physics related to radioactive decay. Properties of the elements and the production of electromagnetic and charged particles radiation. Instruction on the modes of radioactive decay, the general decay equation and its application in the nuclear medicine radiopharmacy. Instruction on the interaction of ionizing radiation with matter, attenuation and shielding of electromagnetic radiation described by the general attenuation equation and its application. Instruction on the basic physics, construction, constituent components and operation of the general, small instrument type radiation detectors—gas filled, scintillation, and semiconductor detectors.

.25 credit

The medical terminology course consists of a study of root words, prefixes and suffixes of medical vocabulary. Also included are medical abbreviations and applicable symbols. A combination of learning exercises and chapter quizzes are utilized. Emphasis is on application of terminology through the use of chapter objectives, learning exercises, and critical thinking exercises. As an independent study, students may choose to progress more rapidly than the assignment schedule outlines.

Radiation Therapy Track

.25 credit

Self-study course designed to introduce terms related to medical science, hospital services, medical specialties such as pathology and radiology, and abbreviations used in medicine. Content emphasizes those medical roots and terms needed for coherent comprehension of clinical information, including their spelling and pronunciation.

.50 credit

This course is designed to introduce students to clinical education via simulated labs and the first exposure to clinical experience.

.25 credit

This course introduces the student to the field of radiation therapy with emphasis on the principles of terminology and history, as well as an orientation to clinical practices within NMH and its affiliates. Topics also include basic safety and behavioral/attitudinal expectations of the student in clinical practice. Concepts of ethics, legal responsibility, and cultural awareness are also addressed to provide a foundation prior to students beginning clinical practice.

.50 credit

Content is designed to provide an overview of cancer and the specialty of radiation therapy. The medical, biological, and pathological aspect, as well as the physical and technical aspects, will be discussed This course will also include content designed to provide the student with fundamental concepts, theories, and application of healthcare laws and ethical standards implemented and practiced in quality management for radiation therapy. Analysis of legal terminology, sources of law, and the litigation process as applied to health professionals will be evaluated.

.50 credit

This course introduces the student to the field of pathology with an emphasis on the oncologic disease processes. Topics range from discussion of pathology from the cellular level through various organ systems. Students are introduced to terminology related to the field of pathology as a whole and to the subspecialty of oncology specifically.

.50 credit

Students are introduced to the principles and practice of applying ionizing radiation to the human body. Topics include discussion of radiation therapy equipment, including treatment units and computer planning systems with an emphasis on how this equipment is used to produce proper treatment planning and dose calculations, according to the radiation oncologist’s prescription. Topics also include fundamental concepts of general physics and radiation physics, including the production of x-rays and x-ray interactions with matter.

.25 credit

This course introduces students to the radiologic sciences. Emphasis is placed on x-ray production, image formation, and the technical aspects of radiography equipment. Basic radiation safety concepts will also be introduced.

.50 credit

Procedure for imaging human structure and their relevance to radiation therapy; topographical anatomy, radiographic and cross sectional anatomy. Identification of anatomic structures as demonstrated through various imaging modalities. This course also provides the student therapist with the technical aspects of radiography equipment. Discussion will include orientation to the function and operation of radiography equipment.

.50 credit

Content is designed to provide the student with foundation concepts and competencies in assessment and evaluation of the patient for service delivery. Psychological and physical needs and factors affecting treatment outcome will be presented and examined. Students will also get a better understanding of how race, gender, physical ability, sexual orientation, spirituality, healing and dying, and age play a role in cultural competence. Routine and emergency care procedures will be presented. Course will also include an orientation to hyperthermia, chemotherapy, body mechanics, and nutrition for cancer patients, and an overview of radiation therapy’s side effects in patients.

.50 credit

The purpose of this course is to educate students regarding institutional, state, and federal regulations controlling the safe use and disposal of radiation-producing equipment and sources. Emphasis is placed on ALARA principles to define the health professional’s legal and ethical responsibility to minimize radiation dose to co-workers and patients, and oneself.

.75 credit

Content is designed to examine and evaluate the management of neoplastic disease using knowledge in arts and sciences, while promoting critical thinking and the basics of ethical clinical decision making. The epidemiology, etiology, detection, diagnosis, patient condition, treatment, and prognosis of neoplastic disease will be presented, discussed, and evaluated in relationship to histology, anatomical site, and patterns of spread. The radiation therapist’s responsibility in the management of neoplastic disease will be examined and linked to the skills required to analyze complex issues and make informed decisions. Critical thinking and the basics of ethical clinical decision making are fostered in the student. The epidemiology, etiology, detection, diagnosis, patient condition, treatment, and prognosis of neoplastic disease will be presented, discussed, and evaluated in relationship to histology, anatomical site, and patterns of spread. The radiation therapist’s responsibility in the management of neoplastic disease will be examined and linked to the skills required to analyze complex issues and make informed decisions while appreciating the character of the profession.

.50 credit

This course provides the student therapist with the technical aspects of radiation therapy. Discussion will include orientation to the function and operation of radiation therapy equipment. The clinical lab component of this course provides a hands-on, sequential application, and clinical integration of concepts and theories in the radiation therapy clinic and the didactic portion of this course. Concepts of team practice, patient-centered and clinical practice will also be discussed.

.50 credit

Students are introduced to the principles and practice of applying ionizing radiation to the human body. Topics include discussion of radiation therapy equipment, including treatment units and computer planning systems with an emphasis on how this equipment is used to produce proper treatment planning and dose calculations, according to the radiation oncologist’s prescription. Radiation protection and quality assurance will also be covered. This course is a continuation of Radiation Therapy Physics I.

.25 credit

Content is designed to focus on the evolution of quality management (QM) programs and continuing quality improvement in radiation oncology. Topics will include the need for quality assurance (QA) checks; QA of the clinical aspects and chart checks, film checks; the various types of evaluations and tests performed on simulators, megavoltage therapy equipment, and therapy planning units; the role of radiation therapists in quality management programs; legal and regulatory implications for maintaining appropriate guidelines; and the role computers and information systems serve within the radiation oncology department.

.25 credit

Content is designed to focus on various allied health operational issues. Continuing Quality Improvement (CQI) project development, evaluation, and assessment techniques will be emphasized. Human resource issues and regulations impacting the radiation therapist will be examined. Accreditation agencies and the licensed practitioner’s role in the accreditation process will be presented. Billing and reimbursement issues will be covered.

.75 credit

The overall objective of this course is to aid the student in achieving basic level technical skills through supervised practice of radiation therapy procedures on actual patients. This is a continuation of Clinical Practicum I. Students will be required to complete some ARRT required clinical competency examinations during this course.

.75 credit

This is a continuation of Technical Radiation Therapy I with discussions of various treatment and simulation procedures the different pathologies. The lab component will continue to provide a hands-on, sequential application, and clinical integration of concepts and theories in the radiation therapy clinic.

.25 credit

This course introduces the student to the effects of ionizing radiation and chemotherapeutic agents on living tissue. Emphasis is placed on the concept of the therapeutic ratio and the manipulation of influencing factors in order to affect patient treatment outcomes.

.75 credit

The overall objective of this course is to aid the student in achieving basic level technical skills through supervised practice of radiation therapy procedures on actual patients. Students will be required to complete some ARRT required clinical competency examinations during this course.

.75 credit

The overall objective of this course is to aid the student in achieving basic level technical skills through supervised practice of radiation therapy procedures on actual patients. This is a continuation of Clinical Practicum II. Students will be required to complete all remaining ARRT required clinical competency examinations during this course.

.50 credit

Students will be given a series of comprehensive examinations in order to prepare them for the ARRT registry examination in radiation therapy technology.

.25 credit

This course is designed to present a more in depth overview of CT scanning and cross-sectional anatomy. Specific topics include the physics and instrumentation of CT scanning, image production, and cross-sectional anatomy of the head, neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Emphasis will be placed on patient considerations, patient safety, and radiation protection.

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