Courses

Course offerings reflect the 2018-2019 Elmhurst College Catalog. One unit of credit equals four semester hours.

.50 credit

Using an interdisciplinary case study approach, this course examines the philosophy, goals and clinical approaches used in working with infants/toddlers who are “at risk” and disabled and their families. Special focus is placed on the design and implementation of family-centered services, the development of collaborative team processes among professionals, and the implementation of the IFSP. This course includes a field experience clinical component.

.50 credit

This course highlights a developmental approach to observation and assessment of typical and atypical infants and toddlers. Students focus on underlying developmental processes in cognitive, language, motor and social/emotional development. Students learn to assess children’s strengths as well as needs and examine selected screening and informal and formal assessment tools. The involvement of families in assessment and collaborative goal setting is stressed. This course includes a field experience clinical component.

.75 credit

This course presents major developmental theories and models of cognitive, psychosocial, emotional and play development of young children birth to age 5. Personality is traced from birth to age 5. Students will study the interrelated nature of development and culture and the characteristics of and influences of disabilities and risk factors on development. This course includes a field experience clinical component.

.75 credit

Study of the typical and atypical language development in young children, including specific language/communication delays. Course includes examination of the relationship between language/communication delays and other areas of development, specifically emergent literacy, exploring the use of alternative communication systems to foster communication. This course includes a field experience clinical component.

.50 credit

This first practicum provides students with Early Intervention Family Mentor Field Experience and supports students in their beginning exposure to working with Developmental Therapists in the Early Intervention field. It is a 10-session seminar on working in the Early Intervention field with families of children ages birth to 3 who have disabilities. This seminar will provide a forum for students to meet with their cohort and reflect upon their birth–3 Family Mentor experience and clinical field experience in relation to course wrap around assignments, such as Infant Assessment, Early Intervention Methods, and Typical and Atypical Development. This seminar will support students in areas of self-reflective practice, building relationships with families and providers, understanding family priorities, resources, routines and all aspects in the development of Individualized Family Service Plans (IFSP). Students will also complete introductory work on their e-portfolios in this seminar. Clinical component: requires 30 hours of work with developmental therapists and family mentors.

.75 credit

Strategies, procedures, and formal and informal instruments for assessing young children’s social, emotional, cognitive, communication and motor skills; family concerns, priorities and resources; and school, home and community learning environments; and methods for conducting formative and summative individual and program evaluation. This course includes a field experience clinical component.

.75 credit

This course focuses on developmentally and individually appropriate methods for fostering the social, emotional, cognitive, communication, adaptive and motor development and learning of young children with special needs in various settings such as the home, the school and the community. This course includes a field experience clinical component.

.75 credit

This is an integrative classroom methods course focused on developmentally appropriate planning and content area instruction for children ages 3 to 5 in math, science, social science, fine arts, physical development and health curricula. Candidates will learn how to plan meaningful content area lessons that are based on best practices and current standards. They will also learn how to critically reflect upon instruction to improve lessons and plan next steps. This course includes a field experience clinical component.

.25 credit

This eight-week seminar will provide students a forum to discuss their 30 hours of field work required in an early childhood special education classroom setting this semester. Focus of seminar discussions will include observations, initial lesson planning, implementation of instructional strategies and assessing student learning outcomes in early childhood special education classrooms. An overview of Graduate e-portfolio assignments and check point 1 requirements will also be covered. Clinical hours required: 30 hours in ECSE classrooms.

.75 credit

This course covers theories of interpersonal relationships, the family life cycle, parenthood as a developmental process, cultural influences on child rearing practices and the effects of disability on a family. The family stress, coping and adaptation process and family systems theory are also included. Students will learn about planning family-focused interventions and developing strategies for working collaboratively with parents/families in a variety of settings. This course includes a field experience clinical component.

.75 credit

A study of the language and literacy curriculum, materials, texts and technology for the primary grades (K-3) focusing on foundational knowledge, research-based instructional methods, monitoring student learning through assessment, content area reading, and constructing a supportive language and literacy environment. Teacher candidates apply research-based instructional methods successful for supporting all learners’ literacy across the content areas. Assignments provide opportunities to administer, evaluate and communicate a wide range of developmentally appropriate literacy assessments to monitor student learning and plan instruction designed to meet the needs of diverse learners. This course includes a field experience clinical component.

An integrative classroom methods course focused on developmentally appropriate planning and content-area instruction for primary grades math, science and social science curricula. Candidates will learn how to plan meaningful content-area lessons that are based on best practices and current standards. They will also learn how to critically reflect upon instruction to improve lessons and plan next steps. The course meets for six hours a week, three of which are devoted to education lab experiences. This course includes a field experience clinical component.

.50 credit

This is an advanced 10-session seminar that wraps around licensure students’ field-based experience in Early Childhood Special Education and Early Primary K-2 classroom settings in public schools. It is designed to apply knowledge and skills from coursework with a focus on providing effective instructional practice, creating optimal learning environments, engaging in professional collaborations and learning about school policies and procedures and reflective practice skills. Also included in this seminar will be an overview of graduate e-portfolio assignments and checkpoint 2 requirements along with planning for edTPA and the Action Research Project.

Clinical hour requirement: 30 in ECSE classroom and 30 in primary classroom.

.75 credit

This course is designed to provide an understanding of different approaches to research with emphasis placed on the action research process. The application that research has to practice is examined along with statistical methods applied to social data. Descriptive statistics, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, correlation and regression are covered. The uses of research and statistical methods and presentation of data in early childhood research are discussed. All students will design an action research project.

1.5 credits

These two eight-week, full-time student teaching experiences provide graduate students seeking a professional teaching license in Early Childhood Education with an Early Childhood Special Education preschool placement and an Early Primary (K-2) placement in school-based programs for preschool-aged children with disabilities and their families and Early Primary educational experiences. Students will be given the opportunity to develop, refine and demonstrate those competencies that are essential for effective intervention planning and implementations in these Early Childhood Special Education and Early Primary K-2 settings. Students will be evaluated on the basis of the behaviors described on the Early Childhood Special Education Evaluation form in addition to satisfactory completion of all assignments. All students seeking a professional educator license will also be completing an edTPA during one of their school-based student teaching placements. A supportive, collegial seminar designed to foster self-reflection and professionalism is scheduled to meet bi-weekly for eight sessions during the 16 weeks of student teaching placements.

ESL Endorsement Courses

.75 credit

This course is designed for teachers to examine the relationship among culture, classroom practices and policy, and how this relationship influences the education of English language learners. Teachers begin by examining their own culture and their cultural assumptions and biases and how those influence teaching and learning in the classroom. Issues of equity, access and cross-cultural understandings are examined as well. Teachers will evaluate and design content materials and methods for implementing a multicultural approach to curriculum in the classroom.

.75 credit

This course is an introduction to and immersion into the theoretical frameworks of English as a Second Language (ESL) and bilingual education and the research, movements and policies that inform them. A variety of ESL/bilingual models and programs in pre-K through 12 schools and classrooms will be identified, analyzed and evaluated through multiple assignments and media. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between theory and practice and will define their roles as teachers of and advocates for English learners.

This course requires field experience hours in an ESL and/or bilingual P-12 classroom.

.75 credit

The purpose of this course is to introduce linguistic concepts as they apply to teaching in a variety of contexts, including (but not limited to) monolingual and bilingual classrooms. In addition, this course is designed to provide teachers with a meta-linguistic awareness in order to facilitate learning and instruction. This course will help us understand, think and talk about the complexities of language, learning and human development. The fields of linguistics, applied linguistics and linguistic anthropology are dedicated to questions about the nature, function and purposes of language, and we will be using readings anchored in these disciplines to navigate our journey.

This course requires field experience hours in an ESL and/or bilingual P-12 classroom.

.75 credit

This is an advanced course in the teaching of bilingual and sheltered English instruction to English language learners (ELLs). Students will learn different approaches and methodologies used to support the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing in social and academic contexts. The course provides opportunities for students to develop curricula for ELLs in bilingual and ESL classrooms, and examine instructional delivery through videotaping and analyzing practice.

This course requires field experience hours in an ESL and/or bilingual P-12 classroom. Prerequisite: MTL 558.

.75 credit

This course will focus on the discussion of basic principles and current approaches to assessment of language learning students in ESL and bilingual P-12 educational settings, including the policies, procedures and issues that inform the assessment of ELLs. Students will learn about the different purposes of process and product assessment tools, authentic and curriculum-based forms of assessment, issues in the assessment of English Language Learners (ELLs), and assessment of academic content knowledge. Students will have opportunities to examine critically and practice administering assessment tools used in current educational contexts. Students will learn to identify language needs and how to differentiate them from developmental needs.

This course requires field experience hours in an ESL and/or bilingual P-12 classroom.

.75 credit

This is an advanced course in the inquiry and application of bilingual and ESL methods. Students will study their own teaching of bilingual and ESL methodologies designed to support the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing in social and academic concepts. Through the implementation of an action research model of teacher inquiry, teachers will examine critically their bilingual and ESL instructional practices and develop a situated and transformative action plan for future teaching that is anchored in sociocultural views of learning. Teachers will learn how to use action research methods to collect data on teaching practices and for graduate research projects.

This course requires field experience hours in an ESL and/or bilingual P-12 classroom. Prerequisites: MTL 544, MTL 558, MTL 569 and MTL

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