Concert Program Notes

Thank you for supporting Elmhurst University’s performing ensembles. Please find the program notes for each concert performance of the season below.

Holiday Concert

Dec. 11, 2022

Steven Mead is known as one of the world’s leading brass soloists, having played with many of the world’s finest wind and brass bands and orchestras.

His sensational career as a professional soloist continues at an astonishing pace, and with over seventy-five solo performances a year, his relentless schedule sees him touring almost constantly.

He is Professor of Euphonium at the Royal Northern College of Music and also at teaches at several specialist schools across Europe, including Augsburg University and the Milan Conservatory.

His remarkable solo career followed on from success he achieved as a member of several of the UK’s leading brass bands, including the Desford Colliery Band in the mid 80’s when they won a hat trick of victories in the National Brass Band Championships.

He has played solo concerti with symphony orchestras in Norway (Trondheim Symphony Orchestra) , Finland (Lahti Symphony Orchestra cond.Osmo Vänskä, and Helsinki Philharmonic cond. Elgar Howarth), Poland (Capella Cracoviensis), USA, Canada, Italy, Japan, and Lithuania.

He has also given concert tours and recorded with several leading professional chamber ensembles in Europe, including Sound-Inn-Brass, Spanish Brass, Trombonisti Italiani, London Brass and is a founder member of the Brass Band of Battle Creek.

As an innovator for the whole ‘low brass’ world in general, he has organized all six of the National Tuba Euphonium Conferences, held in the UK, and was Artistic Director of the next International Euphonium Tuba Conference,  held in Austria in June 2012.

His innovation is also evident with his premiere performances of new concerti and major works by Martin Ellerby, Philip Sparke, Torstein Aagaard Nilsen, Tadeusz Kassatti, John Reeman, Derek Bourgeois, Vladimir Cosma, Thomas Dos, Howard Snell to name but a few.

He has been described as one of the world’s most recorded solo brass artists with over 75 CDs to his credit. Several of these CDs have won major international awards.

He is the owner of the music label, Bocchino Music which now produces and distributes his albums. In recent years he has also produced CDs for major labels including Naxos.

Steven has been the Artistic Director of the Jeju International Wind Ensemble Festival, South Korea (2013-2020) and is currently also Artistic Director of the Bolsover International Brass Band Summer School.

Steve is also owner of the popular low brass web store.

Steven has been an artist, designer and clinician with Besson for many years, and is acclaimed for his contribution to the success of the Besson euphoniums.

In recent years he has also been increasingly sought after as an adjudicator and conductor.

Misa Mead was born in the city of Kumamoto, in the south west of Japan. She graduated from Tokyo College of Music in 2008. At both high school and university, she was a scholarship student.

Misa won the unanimous Gold Medal at the European Solo Competition for Young Soloists in Luxembourg 2011, as well winning the first prize at the 4th All-Japan Junior High and Senior High School Students Wind Instruments Solo Contest, 2000, and the 25th All-Kyushu Music Competition Gold Award 2001. At the highly prestigious Jeju International Wind and Percussion Solo Competition 2012 and 2014, South Korea, she won third prize. Misa graduated with Honors at the Conservatory at regional radiation of Paris 2012.

Misa appeared as a guest artist in March 2013 at Tubamania Festivals in Thailand and May 2013 at the South West Region Tuba Euphonium Conference (SWRTEC) in California, USA, performing her own compositions. In 2013 she was appointed High School Performance Assistant at the Tokyo College of Music. She also worked closely with the Tokyo-based Spiel Kammerensemble.

Since July 2013, Misa moved to the UK, and performed many concerts in more than twenty countries. She married the famous British euphonium artist Steven Mead in March 2014, and changed her name from Misa Akahoshi to Misa Mead. Her debut CD Journey, was released to great critical acclaim.

Misa is an active as freelance composer and orchestrator. Many of her works are published by ASKS Winds (Japan) and Bocchino Music (UK) distributed worldwide.

Misa is a Besson Euphonium Artist and represents the Buffet Group around the world with her solo activities.

Misa is playing Besson Sovereign 967T in Lacquer.

Toboggan

JaRod Hall

A toboggan is a long narrow sled used to slide downhill over snow or ice. The music tells the tale of an epic race down the biggest hill in the neighborhood. As the day begins, the first few snowflakes begin to fall, depicted by the solo bells that start the piece. As the flurries continue to fall, the snow builds, and the tempo picks up, kids begin pouring out of their homes to prepare for the race. While outside, they witness several snowball fights emerge around the neighborhood. The race begins atop a snow-covered hill as the children speed toward the finish line. French horns pave the way through the middle section by illustrating the gorgeous landscape as the racers smoothly slide through the soft snow – a beautiful clear sky on the horizon. As the finish line pops into view, the racers frantically fly through the course, dodging stray snowballs overhead in an exciting finish. The perfect chilly concert opener or closer, I proudly present to you: Toboggan.

Program Note by the composer.

Sleigh Ride

Leroy Anderson

Sleigh Ride is a light orchestra standard whose music was composed by Leroy Anderson. The composer had formed the original idea for the piece during a heat wave in July 1946, and he finished the work in February 1948. The original recordings were instrumental versions. The lyrics, about riding in a sleigh and other fun wintertime activities, were written by Mitchell Parish in 1950. The orchestral version was first recorded in 1949 by Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops Orchestra.

Program Note from Wikipedia

The Green Hill

Bert Appermiont

Bert Appermont dug deep into Celtic music for inspiration and created a fantasy that shows off the incredible, but often overlooked, versatility of the euphonium. Charming lyrical melodies, virtuosic runs and exciting, colourful tuttis create plenty of contrast in this exciting work. This piece was commissioned by Swiss euphonium virtuoso Erich Schmidli.

Program Note by the Publisher.

Fantasia in G

Timothy Mahr

Fantasia in G is a joyful celebration for winds and percussion.  The piece was inspired by the opening line of Johann von Schiller’s poem Ode to Joy: “Freude, Schoner Gotterfunken” (Joy, Bright Spark of Divinity).  This text was used by Ludwig van Beethoven in his famed Symphony No. 9, and Beethoven’s theme is found throughout the Fantasia. Fantasia in G was written for the St. Olaf College Band and was first performed by that ensemble in January 1983.

Program Note by the Publisher.

A Christmas Festival

Leroy Anderson

A Christmas Festival, composed in 1950, is a concert overture built upon traditional Christmas songs. Originally recorded by the Boston Pops, it is the Christmas medley that sets the standard for all others. Anderson has encompassed the joy, celebration, and solemnity of Christmas in his arrangements of Joy To The World • Deck the Halls • God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen • Good King Wenceslas • Hark! The Herald Angels Sing • The First Noel • Silent Night • Jingle Bells and O Come, All Ye Faithful.

Program Note from Walnut Creek (Calif.) Concert Band.

Symphonic Prelude of Adeste Fideles

Claude T. Smith

O Come, All Ye Faithful (originally written in Latin as Adeste Fideles) is a Christmas carol which has been attributed to various authors, including John Francis Wade (1711–1786), with the earliest copies of the hymn all bearing his signature, John Reading (1645–1692) and King John IV of Portugal (1604–1656). The original four verses of the hymn were extended to a total of eight, and these have been translated into many languages. The English translation of O Come, All Ye Faithful by the English Catholic priest Frederick Oakeley, written in 1841, is widespread in most English-speaking countries. The present harmonization is from the English Hymnal (1906). Beginning with an unaccompanied trumpet solo and progressing to a trumpet duet, full brass choir, woodwind choir and finally the complete band, this brilliant rhapsodic setting by Claude Smith provides you with an exceptionally musical and “tasteful” selection.

Program Note from Wikipedia and the Publisher.

Joyride

Michael Markowski

Nearly ten years ago, in the summer of 2005, I was on stage at Carnegie Hall in New York City playing alto saxophone as a senior in my high school band. The concert lineup: Grainger, de Meij, Mackey, and just under three minutes of Markowski.  When my band director, Jon Gomez, first received word that our high school music department was selected to perform in New York, he asked me if I’d like to write something to open the concert and commemorate the trip—something that was bursting with joy. “Maybe,” he suggested, “it would be cool to take something more traditional, like Beethoven’s Ode To Joy, and blend it with something more modern, like John Adams.” The idea was so simple and so astounding that the assignment excited me immediately—it excited me so much that within ten days, I had completed the first complete draft of joyRiDE, a two-and-a-half-minute concert opener that borrows Beethoven’s infamous melody and dresses it in a tie-dye blazer of rhythm and texture that nod humbly to John Adams’s Short Ride In A Fast Machine.

Program note by the Composer.

Sussex Mummers’ Carol

Percy Grainger

By kind permission of Miss Lucy E. Broadwood. Begun 1905, ended 1911. The tune was noted by Miss Lucy E. Broadwood at Lyne, near Horsham (Sussex), in 1880 and 1881 from the singing of Christmas Mummers called ‘Tipteers’ or ‘Tipteerers’ during their play of ‘St. George, the Turk, and the seven champions of Christendom’. See English Traditional Songs and Carols (Boosey & Co.) by Lucy E. Broadwood, pp. 80 and 122, and Journal of the Folk-Song Society, vol. ii, No. 7, p. 128.

The words sung to the final verse of the Carol are:

God bless your house,
Your children too,
Your cattle and your store;
The Lord increase you day by day,
And send you more and more.

Program note from cover of Grainger’s original 1911 piano version.

Percy Grainger was born in Melbourne, Australia, in 1882, leaving in 1895 to study piano in Frankfurt, Germany. He made a career as a touring pianist in the British Isles, while at the same time collecting folk songs from the British and Irish countryside. He emigrated to the United States at the outset of World War I, and enlisted in the United States Army as a bandsman, playing saxophone. After the war, Grainger eventually settled in White Plains, New York. Despite being born in Australia and living in the United States, he was a fierce nationalist and incredibly interested in the aforementioned folk music of the British Isles. His many compositions and arrangements of folk music sought to introduce these folk idioms into the concert hall.

Program Note from University of Maryland Wind Orchestra.

Pantomime

Philip Sparke

Pantomime was commissioned by euphonium virtuoso Nick Childs in 1986. Designed to show off both the lyrical and technical prowess of the instrument, the piece draws on the varied characters of the Italian Commedia dell’Arte tradition for its wide emotional range.

Program Note from the Publisher.

Two-Part Invention

Philip Sparke

Bob and Nick Childs asked the composer for a short piece for a concert in the autumn of 1989.

The work falls into two sections (requested by the soloists). The first is a slow and dreamy arietta, in which both soloists present their own, contrasting tunes which later combine. A short flourish leads to an Allegro Vivo where the players get a chance to show off their virtuoso techniques as only they can!

Aurora Awakes

John Mackey

Aurora now had left her saffron bed,
And beams of early light the heav’ns o’erspread,
When, from a tow’r, the queen, with wakeful eyes,
Saw day point upward from the rosy skies.

– Virgil, The Aeneid, Book IV, Lines 584-587

Aurora – the Roman goddess of the dawn – is a mythological figure frequently associated with beauty and light. Also known as Eos (her Greek analogue), Aurora would rise each morning and stream across the sky, heralding the coming of her brother Sol, the sun. Though she is herself among the lesser deities of Roman and Greek mythologies, her cultural influence has persevered, most notably in the naming of the vibrant flashes of light that occur in Arctic and Antarctic regions – the Aurora Borealis and Aurora Australis.

John Mackey’s Aurora Awakes is, thus, a piece about the heralding of the coming of light. Built in two substantial sections, the piece moves over the course of eleven minutes from a place of remarkable stillness to an unbridled explosion of energy – from darkness to light, placid grey to startling rainbows of color. The work is almost entirely in the key of E-flat major (a choice made to create a unique effect at the work’s conclusion, as mentioned below), although it journeys through G-flat and F as the work progresses. Despite the harmonic shifts, however, the piece always maintains a – pun intended – bright optimism.

Though Mackey is known to use stylistic imitation, it is less common for him to utilize outright quotation. As such, the presence of two more-or-less direct quotations of other musical compositions is particularly noteworthy in Aurora Awakes. The first, which appears at the beginning of the second section, is an ostinato based on the familiar guitar introduction to U2’s “Where The Streets Have No Name.” Though the strains of The Edge’s guitar have been metamorphosed into the insistent repetitions of keyboard percussion, the aesthetic is similar – a distant proclamation that grows steadily in fervor. The difference between U2’s presentation and Mackey’s, however, is that the guitar riff disappears for the majority of the song, while in Aurora Awakes, the motive persists for nearly the entirety of the remainder of the piece:

“When I heard that song on the radio last winter, I thought it was kind of a shame that he only uses that little motive almost as a throwaway bookend.  That’s my favorite part of the song, so why not try to write an entire piece that uses that little hint of minimalism as its basis?”

The other quotation is a sly reference to Gustav Holst’s First Suite in E-flat for Military Band. The brilliant E-flat chord that closes the Chaconne of that work is orchestrated (nearly) identically as the final sonority of Aurora Awakes – producing an unmistakably vibrant timbre that won’t be missed by aficionados of the repertoire. This same effect was, somewhat ironically, suggested by Mackey for the ending of composer Jonathan Newman’s My Hands Are a City. Mackey adds an even brighter element, however, by including instruments not in Holst’s original:

“That has always been one of my favorite chords because it’s just so damn bright.  In a piece that’s about the awaking of the goddess of dawn, you need a damn bright ending — and there was no topping Holst.  Well… except to add crotales.”

Program Note by Jake Wallace.

Elmhurst University Music Department

Interim Chair: Dr. James Hile

Administrative Assistants: Trish Thoren and Kate Reeter

Elmhurst University Applied Wind and  Percussion Faculty

Flute: Professor Marie Bennett
Oboe: Professor Julie Popplewell
Bassoon: Professor Dianne Ryan
Clarinet: Professor Andrea DiOrio
Saxophone: Professor Matthew Beck
Trumpet: Professor Christopher O’Hara
French Horn: Professor Anna Mayne
Trombone: Professor Thomas Stark
Euphonium/Tuba: Professor Josh Wirt
Percussion: Professor Bob Rummage

Elmhurst University Concert Band Staff

Director of Bands/Wind Ensemble
Dr. James Hile

Director of Symphonic Band
Mr. John Heath

Director of Varsity Band
Mr. Eric Morong

Band Managers: Morgan Bilancia, Colin Curatolo, Madelyn Soldan

Librarians: Leo Rodriguez, Claudia Rejowski

Work Study: Crystal Adaya, Karabeth Footman, Tyler Jozwiak, Sean Marotta,
Ian Martinez, Sebastian Martinez, Sharon McAllister, Charlie Rossi, Christopher Tejeda

Program and Poster Design: Mrs. Kate Reeter and Claudia Rejowski

Reference Recordings: Mr. Randy Beschorner

Recording: Mr. John Towner and Student Recording Services

About the Conductors

Dr. James Hile is the Director of Concert Bands at Elmhurst University where his
responsibilities include conducting the Elmhurst University Wind Ensemble and teaching
courses in conducting and band arranging. Hile most recently served as the Assistant
Director of Bands at Eastern Illinois University, and previously as Director of Bands at
Highland Park High School (IL), Director of Bands at the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, Assistant Director of Bands at the University of Illinois, and Director of Bands at
Santa Monica High School (CA).
Hile has done numerous arrangements for university, high school, and professional bands
across the United States, including performances by the United States Army Band, United
States Army Brass Band, the United States Air Force Band, the Interlochen Music Academy
Bands, the Dallas Wind Symphony, and the Israel Philharmonic Winds. Hile has received
numerous awards for teaching excellence at both public school and collegiate levels and is
also a recipient of the Citation of Excellence by the National Band Association, the
Outstanding Bandmaster Award by the Illinois Chapter of Phi Beta Mu, the International
Bandmasters Fraternity, and the Chicagoland Outstanding Music Educator Award. Hile has
recently recognized in the Marquis Who’s Who in America.

Mr. John Heath received his Bachelor and Master Degrees in Music Education and Bachelors
Degree in Tuba performance from the University of Illinois. In 2012, Heath retired as
Director of Bands at Batavia High School after twenty-two years. Prior to his position in
Batavia, Heath was Director of Bands in Highland, Illinois for eleven years. During his tenure Heath was the director of the Highland Municipal Concert Band and performed in the St.
Louis Philharmonic Orchestra playing tuba and string bass.

Heath has received numerous honors including: IMEA Distinguished Service Award, “Mr.
Holland’s Opus” Award, Kane County Superintendent’s Award for Teaching Excellence,
Illinois State Board of Education “Those Who Excel” Teaching Award, Chicagoland
Outstanding Music Educator. He is also a recipient of the National Band Association Citation of Excellence. Heath is active as a guest conductor and has served on the staff at the Blue Lake Fine Arts Camp for 21 years. Heath is a past president of the Illinois Music Educators
Association.

Symphonic Band and Wind Ensemble Fall Concert

Oct. 16, 2022

Second Suite in F for Military Band

Gustav Holst

I. March
II. Song without Words “I’ll love my love”
III. Song of the Blacksmith
IV. Fantasia on the “Dargason”

The Second Suite, composed in 1911 and premiered in 1922, uses English folk songs and
folkdance tunes throughout. The suite has four movements, each with its own distinctive
character. The opening march uses three tunes set in the ABCAB form: A is a lively Morris
Dance, B is the folk song “Swansea Town”, and C is the folk song “Claudy Banks.” The second
movement is a tender setting of an English love song. The third movement is complex
rhythmically demonstrating Holst’s inventive scoring imitating a blacksmith’s anvil. The
finale is the English country dance and folk song “Dargason” dating from at least the sixteenth
century, with a bit of the well-known love song now Christmas carol “Greensleeves.”

Program notes from “Band Music Notes”, [R.John Speech, Queensborough Community College], Norman Smith and Albert Stoutmire, p.116.

God of Our Fathers

Claude T. Smith

The well-known hymn, “God of Our Fathers” (words by Daniel C. Roberts, music by George
W. Warren) was written in 1876 for a celebration of the Centennial Fourth of July in Brandon,
Vermont. Claude Smith was commissioned to write God of Our Fathers, for Concert Band by
Fraser, MI High School Symphonic Band with its premiere on December 19, 1974 at the
Midwest Band and Orchestra Clinic, Chicago, Illinois.

Program notes from Wikipedia and the publisher.

Prelude, Siciliano and Rondo

Malcolm Arnold

Prelude, Siciliano and Rondo was originally written for the brass band for which England is
well known. It was titled Little Suite for Brass. John Paynter’s arrangement expands it to
include woodwinds and additional percussion, but faithfully retains the breezy
effervescence of the original composition. All three movements are written in short, clear
five-part song forms: The ABACA design will be instantly apparent to the listener while
giving the imaginative melodies of Arnold a natural, almost folk-like setting. The Prelude is
in fanfare style, followed by the liltingly expressive Siciliano, concluding with the rollicking five-part Rondo.

Program notes from the publisher.

Dunedin March

Kenneth Alford

Kenneth Alford was the pseudonym for Frederick Joseph Ricketts: Alford was his mother’s family name. After his appointment as Bandmaster of the Second Battalion Argyll and
Sutherland Highlanders, his group became the resident band for the New Zealand and South
Seas Exhibition in Wellington, New Zealand. During their six-month stay, the band played
two concerts daily before thousands of enthusiastic listeners. In memory of that occasion, Alford composed this march, Dunedin. The city of Dunedin, New Zealand is the second largest city in the South Island of New Zealand. It comes from the Scottish Gaelic name for
Edinburgh, the capital of Scotland. This arrangement is by William Jastrow.

Program notes from “March Music Notes”, Norman Smith, p. 5 and Wikipedia.

Festive Overture

Dmitri Shostakovich

The Festive Overture was composed in 1954, in the period between Symphony No. 10 and
the Violin Concerto. Its American premiere was given by Maurice Abravanel and the Utah Symphony Orchestra on November 16, 1955. In 1956, the New York Philharmonic under
Dmitri Mitropoulos presented the overture in Carnegie Hall.

A Russian band version of the overture was released in 1958 and utilized the standard
instrumentation of the Russian military band, i.e., a complete orchestral wind, brass and
percussion section plus a full family of saxhorns, ranging from the Bb soprano down through
the Bb contrabass saxhorn. This new edition has been scored for the instrumentation of the
American symphonic band.

The Festive Overture is an excellent curtain raiser and contains one of Shostakovich’s
greatest attributes — the ability to write a long sustained melodic line combined with a
pulsating rhythmic drive. In addition to the flowing melodic passages, there are also
examples of staccato rhythmic sections which set off the flowing line and the variant fanfares.
It is truly a “festive overture.”

Program note from the score, by Donald Hunsberger.

Down a River of Time

Eric Ewazen

The piece, which is a contemplative journey through life, was composed as an aria with string
orchestra. The oboe emulates the voice as it expresses intense emotional and personal
feelings, orchestrating the importance of life’s dreams. Since the oboe is the ultimate
expressive instrument — like the human voice — it speaks passionately. Furthermore, the
great range of tonal colors and articulation available to the oboist have the ability to
dramatically transform the feelings explored. The work captures the cycle of life in a very
virtuosic manner. Each of the movement titles, with their progression — “Past Hopes and
Dreams … and Sorrows … and Memories of Tomorrow” — present imagery of traveling down
the river of life with its ebb and flow. The first movement, “… Past Hopes and Dreams,” is
energetic, like the rushing tide of time. It is a young person’s journey — representing activity,
relaxation, peace, hard work and excitement. Flourishes of energetic ostinato patterns create
a feeling of water imagery in the solo part as well as the accompaniment allowing hints of
impressionism to permeate the movement. Undulation between major and minor tonalities
give the sense of a full range of emotional experience from a point of retrospect.

Program note by the composer.

Symphony No. 2

David Maslanka

Symphony No. 2 was commissioned by the Big Ten Band Directors Association in 1983. I was
asked to write a major work for full band. The Symphony was given its premiere at the 1987
CBDNA Convention in Evanston, Illinois. The performing group was the combined Symphonic Band and Symphonic Wind Ensemble of Northwestern University under the direction of John P. Paynter. The finale of this Symphony is in sonata form. There are three broad theme areas occupying more than a third of the movement, a development based primarily on themes one and three, a recapitulation (minus the third theme area), and a brief coda. The underlying impulse of this movement is an exuberant, insistent outpouring of energy, demanding a high level of
playing precision and physical endurance from the performers.

Program note by the composer.

Come Sunday

Omar Thomas

I played trombone in wind ensembles from the 4th grade through college. This experience
has contributed significantly to the life I lead now. I had the pleasure of being exposed to
sounds, colors, moods, rhythms, and melodies from all over the world. Curiously absent,
however, was music told authentically from the African-American experience. In particular,
I couldn’t understand how it was that no composer ever thought to tell the story of a black worship experience through the lens of a wind ensemble. I realize now that a big part of this was an issue of representation. One of the joys and honors of writing music for wind
ensemble is that I get to write music that I wish had existed when I was playing in these
groups — music that told the story of the black experience via black composers. I am so
grateful to Dr. Tony Marinello and the Illinois State University Wind Symphony for leading
an incredible consortium that brought this piece to life. I can’t tell you how much I’m looking
forward to hanging with Tony and the group for a week in about a month’s time!

Come Sunday is a two-movement tribute to the Hammond organ’s central role in black
worship services. The first movement, Testimony, follows the Hammond organ as it readies
the congregation’s hearts, minds, and spirits to receive The Word via a magical union of Bach,
blues, jazz, and R&B. The second movement, Shout!, is a virtuosic celebration — the frenzied
and joyous climactic moment(s) when The Spirit has taken over the service. The title is a
direct nod to Duke Ellington, who held an inspired love for classical music and allowed it to
influence his own work in a multitude of ways. To all the black musicians in wind ensemble
who were given opportunity after opportunity to celebrate everyone else’s music but our
own — I see you and I am you. This one’s for the culture!

Program Note by the composer.

Guest Artist: Julie Popplewell

Julie Popplewell received her Bachelor’s of Music in Oboe Performance from the University
of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. While at UIUC, she won the Smith Music Competition,
earning a full tuition scholarship. Julie has studied with renowned oboists — Dr. Nancy
Ambrose King, Daniel Stolper, and Scott Hostetler. Additionally, she has studied with Grover Schiltz, Deb Stevenson, Jelena Dirks, Lora Schaefer, Gordon Hunt, and Richard Killmer. After post-graduate work done at DePaul University, Julie quickly became an active freelance oboist and teacher in the Chicago area, maintaining an oboe studio consisting of 30+ students in the western suburbs.

Julie’s orchestral experiences include Chicago Modern Orchestra Project, Northbrook
Symphony Orchestra, Chicago Chamber Orchestra and the Chicago Camerata among
others. She also is an active soloist and chamber ensemble member with Bel Sonore Chamber Ensemble and Duo Voce.

Julie has a unique pedagogical style and prides herself on her reed making skills. Many of her students have earned youth symphony chairs, collegiate scholarships, and have professional careers. Julie currently serves as Professor of Oboe at Elmhurst University.

Elmhurst University Music Department

Interim Chair: Dr. James Hile

Administrative Assistants: Trish Thoren and Kate Reeter

Elmhurst University Applied Wind and  Percussion Faculty

Flute: Professor Marie Bennett
Oboe: Professor Julie Popplewell
Bassoon: Professor Dianne Ryan
Clarinet: Professor Andrea DiOrio
Saxophone: Professor Matthew Beck
Trumpet: Professor Christopher O’Hara
French Horn: Professor Anna Mayne
Trombone: Professor Thomas Stark
Euphonium/Tuba: Professor Josh Wirt
Percussion: Professor Bob Rummage

Elmhurst University Concert Band Staff

Director of Bands/Wind Ensemble
Dr. James Hile

Director of Symphonic Band
Mr. John Heath

Director of Varsity Band
Mr. Eric Morong

Band Managers: Morgan Bilancia, Colin Curatolo, Madelyn Soldan

Librarians: Leo Rodriguez, Claudia Rejowski

Work Study: Crystal Adaya, Karabeth Footman, Tyler Jozwiak, Sean Marotta,
Ian Martinez, Sebastian Martinez, Sharon McAllister, Charlie Rossi, Christopher Tejeda

Program and Poster Design: Mrs. Kate Reeter and Claudia Rejowski

Reference Recordings: Mr. Randy Beschorner

Recording: Mr. John Towner and Student Recording Services

About the Conductors

Dr. James Hile is the Director of Concert Bands at Elmhurst University where his
responsibilities include conducting the Elmhurst University Wind Ensemble and teaching
courses in conducting and band arranging. Hile most recently served as the Assistant
Director of Bands at Eastern Illinois University, and previously as Director of Bands at
Highland Park High School (IL), Director of Bands at the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, Assistant Director of Bands at the University of Illinois, and Director of Bands at
Santa Monica High School (CA).
Hile has done numerous arrangements for university, high school, and professional bands
across the United States, including performances by the United States Army Band, United
States Army Brass Band, the United States Air Force Band, the Interlochen Music Academy
Bands, the Dallas Wind Symphony, and the Israel Philharmonic Winds. Hile has received
numerous awards for teaching excellence at both public school and collegiate levels and is
also a recipient of the Citation of Excellence by the National Band Association, the
Outstanding Bandmaster Award by the Illinois Chapter of Phi Beta Mu, the International
Bandmasters Fraternity, and the Chicagoland Outstanding Music Educator Award. Hile has
recently recognized in the Marquis Who’s Who in America.

Mr. John Heath received his Bachelor and Master Degrees in Music Education and Bachelors
Degree in Tuba performance from the University of Illinois. In 2012, Heath retired as
Director of Bands at Batavia High School after twenty-two years. Prior to his position in
Batavia, Heath was Director of Bands in Highland, Illinois for eleven years. During his tenure Heath was the director of the Highland Municipal Concert Band and performed in the St.
Louis Philharmonic Orchestra playing tuba and string bass.

Heath has received numerous honors including: IMEA Distinguished Service Award, “Mr.
Holland’s Opus” Award, Kane County Superintendent’s Award for Teaching Excellence,
Illinois State Board of Education “Those Who Excel” Teaching Award, Chicagoland
Outstanding Music Educator. He is also a recipient of the National Band Association Citation of Excellence. Heath is active as a guest conductor and has served on the staff at the Blue Lake Fine Arts Camp for 21 years. Heath is a past president of the Illinois Music Educators
Association.

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